Photo Blog / South Korea

Green tea fields

IMG_9138

Selfie Matt

Selfie Matt

Sunrise. We got up to see three sunrises in four days.

Sunrise. We got up to see three sunrises in four days.

Korea is known for green tea. Before moving here, I had read in my travel guide about the green tea fields in Boseong. I inquired about Boseong and tried to make plans to go there, but the distance from Dongsong proved to be cumbersome, and it looked like the trip might not happen. However, we took a few days off after New Year’s Day, and despite a few Koreans telling me not to go since it wouldn’t be pretty, we went anyway.

After our long journey by bus from Seoul (involving Matt sweating so much that he finally went to the driver to tell him he was hot, which resulted in the driver stopping the bus at a rest area because he assumed Matt was having a bathroom emergency) we arrived in Boseong. The town was nothing to write home about, and at 8 p.m. on a Thursday it was eerily desolate. We debated a few hotels and finally decided on one built above a fish restaurant, which made for an interesting smell while walking in.

There was actually a light festival going on that helped make the decision to travel to Boseong for me. I’m thankful that got me there, but that was not what made the trip, and in fact, that wasn’t actually that cool. But that first night, we hopped in a taxi and headed to the light festival, which we were told ended at midnight. After arriving around 10:15 p.m., the attendant said “10 minutes later, end.” So that’s how we saw lights in a tea field for 10 minutes.

Lights line the tea fields at night during the festival.

Lights line the tea fields at night during the festival.

The tunnel of love.

The tunnel of love.

The next day we woke early and hopped on the bus, expecting to go to the same tea fields. However, we got off at a different tea field, the Daehan Dawon Tea Plantation. Wow. I couldn’t believe how green the tea fields were on the second day of January. We also had the fields to ourselves, which I doubt happens when the weather is warmer.

After spending the morning at the tea fields, we got back on the bus to Yulpo, which is a small seaside town nearby. Yulpo is known for having a nice green tea sauna, and we decided to give it a try. It was interesting to soak in green tea seawater, and it did smell nice. Later we enjoyed some nokdon samgyupsal, which is pork from pigs primarily fed green tea leaves. The dish seemed a little hokey, and it was only OK. Later we tried some green tea nangmyeon, which is cold noodles, and it was the best nangmyeon I have had.

Ordering a green tea latte from workers that were suprisingly unfriendly. Usually people are nicer to us in Korea.

Ordering a green tea latte from workers who were surprisingly unfriendly.

A cabbage garden on the side of the road in Yulpo.

A cabbage garden on the side of the road in Yulpo.

Yulpo beach. The sauna was right on the beach so had a similar view while you were soaking.

Yulpo beach. The sauna was right on the beach so had a similar view while you were soaking.

Green tea nangmyeon. Yum!

Green tea nangmyeon. Yum!

We decided to stay one more night and catch the sunrise again the next day. We then headed home to Dongsong, via a bus from Boseong to Gwangju, then Gwangju to Seoul, during which Matt threatened to take his pants off because of the heat; and finally from Seoul to Dongsong, a trip of only about 8 hours.

Boseong green tea fields at sunrise.

Boseong green tea fields at sunrise.

Am I posting too many tea field photos?

Am I posting too many tea field photos?

Does it matter when they look like this!?

Does it matter when they look like this!?

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9 thoughts on “Green tea fields

  1. That sounds awesome- I love everything green tea. Matt being hot on the bus made me Laugh twice!!! Haha

    Sent from my iPhone

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    • We weren’t able to try the green tea ice cream. I guess they didn’t have it because it was winter.

      And yes, Matt was ridiculous. I didn’t want to go into details, but we were sitting in the back row of the bus, which has no curtains to block the sun. Matt was dying and being so ornery, so he managed to rig up his coat to the back of the bus window by using tape from a carry out box. Then the Korean girls next to us noticed and rigged up their coat! Haha. I guess everyone was hot, but no one complained.

  2. The fields are beautiful and I’m surprised at the different colors caught….very nice….and no…not too many pics of them at all. In truth, your pictures are always enjoyable…….any idea what the elevation was? tea here is around the 4000 ft elev for the most part..brrr…b

    • No, I don’t know what the elevation is. I tried to search online but can’t find it. It was definitely warmer than where we live though, so it was nice!

      • Oh, and as for the different colors, the pictures are from three different cameras (including one cell phone) and two different days. One of the cameras has a “vivid” setting, which helps bring out the colors, especially at sunrise.

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